Stabilized Whipped Cream Tutorial

Whipped cream is a great addition to any dessert and even though I am allergic to dairy, once in a blue moon I choose to suffer the consequences just to be able to eat some. I figure the swollen eyes and headache are just temporary and since I don’t eat it all the time I can handle the temporary pain. Lol

One of the problems you will find with whipped cream is that it’s not stable. You can use it at the time you make it but it won’t stay fluffy for long. It starts melting. With Stabilized Whipped Cream you can cover a cake and use for piping on the cake or desserts.

There are a few ways to stabilize it. Some people use cornstarch for a quick fix. I am not a big fan of the taste but the others options used also run along the cornstarch idea. These other options include Powder Milk and Powder Pudding Mix. All of these contain cornstarch. Even if you use just confectioners sugar, you will find that there is cornstarch in it. For me the most stable one is the gelatin recipe, but as you know, I am all about giving you guys all the info.

Making whipped cream is not really difficult, but I do hear people that encounter problems like lumps, whipped cream that’s too runny and other issues. I’ll try to offer some tips that might help, but if you have a fail, just keep in mind that Rome wasn’t built in a day. My advice is to try again. Maybe you used the wrong ingredient, took a wrong step, or missed something. Try again! This is not a new recipe and it works for many, so don’t give up, and try to figure out what went wrong for you.

First for the gelatin, you will need unflavored gelatin. Knox Brand is the most easily found in supermarkets. Great Lakes has another one that is Kosher. A bit more difficult to find but you can always try Amazon. As an added bonus, gelatin is a good source of collagen. Great for skin, nails and hair. If you can’t eat gelatin, you can try Agar-Agar as a thickening agent. For Agar-Agar you really don’t need water. Just dissolve it in milk and make sure that it’s mixed well and then strained to avoid lumps.

Usually you want to sprinkle the gelatin evenly over water.  I don’t know about you guys, but somedays I am just not in the mood to take it slow and I just drop it too fast on the water. Unfortunately, if done improperly, it won’t soak evenly and you will get some lumps. These days I just take a fork and lightly move it to make sure it’s fully mixed. Once the gelatin blooms, it looks like hard jelly. If you want to be safe and properly melt the gelatin without burning it, you can cook it in a double boiler. Some people do it straight in a pan, but if you do this, you will need to cook it on low. You really don’t want to burn it. My favorite and fastest option is the microwave. I cook mine for 30 seconds. Just make sure that the gelatin is clear and fully melted. If you need to cook yours for a longer period, make sure to do it in 10 seconds increments. Once again you don’t want to burn the gelatin. Did I mention that enough? Lol

One of the biggest problems people encounter is adding the warm gelatin to the cold heavy cream. This is where you have to watch yourself. For making whipped cream, you need for your heavy cream to be as cold as you can. Usually it’s even preferred to chill the bowl as well as the whisk attachment. I usually don’t bother too much with that, but maybe in a hot environment it might be a good idea. When working with sugar it’s best to work in areas with air conditioner to avoid issues. If you add the warm gelatin to the cold heavy cream, guess what will happen??? It’ll start getting hard, because that’s what gelatin does when it gets cold; it hardens up. So you can’t let the gelatin cool down all the way because it will start solidifying and you can’t add it when is too hot to the heavy cream because it can get lumpy.

How do I solve this and make sure I don’t have a whipped cream full of lumps? I take some of the heavy cream and leave it at room temperature. Usually around a 1/4 cup will do.

Once I get the gelatin out of the microwave, I leave the gelatin alone and start whipping my cream. This will give the gelatin a few minutes to cool down some. Then once I get the whipped cream to the right consistency, I add the 1/4 cup of heavy cream I left at room temperature to the gelatin and combine that well. This is sure to bring the gelatin down enough so that when you add it to the cold cream, it won’t create lumps.

Another thing I do is to pass the gelatin/ heavy cream mixture through a sifter to ensure I don’t have any lumps in that mix. If you are using a stand mixer, you can slowly pour the gelatin on top of the whipped cream without stopping the mixer. If you have a hand held mixer, just make sure to sift the gelatin before you pour it because it’ll be more difficult to do, since we only have two arms. No matter what, if you watch the tutorial, you will see that I poured the gelatin/heavy cream mixture all at once. I was expecting this might create some lumps since I always use a stand mixer. I can honestly say that it didn’t have one tiny lump. All of it was super smooth. Still, I will advise to slowly pour the gelatin as you mix.

I want to clear up for those who are new to whipped cream, is that you should use a cream that has at least 35% fat in order to get the best results, especially if you want to use it for cakes. It’s confusing when you go to the stores and see all these bottles of cream and not be sure which one to use.

Here are some of the most basic ones but there are others I am not mentioning:

*Half-and-half= 15% fat. In the USA this means that it usually contains 1/2 whole milk and 1/2 cream. It’s not meant for it to be whipped, so save it for your coffee.

*Single Cream= 20% fat. This one has a low fat content. You can use in sweet and savory dishes but it won’t thicken when beaten.

*Light Cream= 18% to 30% fat. It can be used just as half and half and in the higher number of fat content it can be whipped lightly but is not stable. Some people also call this one Single Cream. The fat content will determine its uses, but it won’t ever work for cake.

*Whipping Cream= 30% to 35% Fat. This is where you have to watch for the fat. If it contains less than 30% fat, it will whip up lighter, fluffier and more airy. Great to use over pies and desserts, but the higher content of fat will mean stiffer peaks that are best for piping and covering a cake. So if you get whipping cream, make sure it’s at least 35% fat. Most whipping creams these days are pasteurized in order to extend their shelf life.

*Heavy Whipping Cream= 35% Fat I am adding this one on the list because it’s the one I use. I figure it’s a middle ground between whipping cream and heavy cream. The one I use has exactly 35% fat and works great! With that said, heavy cream is even better when it comes to stiff peaks.

*Heavy Cream= 36-38% Fat. You can also use this higher fat heavy cream for stabilized whipped cream. Higher content of fat will make the mix double in size and tends to hold stiff peaks strongly. This one is great to use for ice creams but it works great for soups and sauces as well without the risk of curdling.

Unpasteurized cream whips much easier than pasteurized. But these days you will find more of the ultra-pasteurized cream because it has a longer shelf life of 60 days before it’s opened.

Pasteurization is a process where they bring the cream to a fast heat of 167 degrees for 15 seconds then cool it down really fast. The ultra-pasteurization process brings the milk to a 280 degree heat and even though it kills bad bacteria, it can take away some of the creaminess in the flavor of the cream. Because of the ultra-pasteurized being heated to 280 degrees, there’s a cooked taste to it and less flavor in comparison to the pasteurized. Also the pasteurized holds better peaks than the ultra but that’s where flavorings and stabilizers help if you find only ultra-pasteurized.When you start working, make sure that the cream is cold as you start and as you mix. If it’s not cold enough, it doesn’t “whip,” it “churns” and we’re not making butter. I suggest to put the bowl and the whisk in the fridge so they’re cold as you mix. If you are in a hot environment, you can place a bowl of ice below your mixing bowl to keep everything chilled. And again remember that if you over mix your whipped cream, you will end up with butter, so keep an eye on it.

 

This is all basic information that is always helpful, especially for those of you who aren’t used to working with these ingredients. Another important piece of information concerns the sugar. You need to use confectioners’ sugar for this recipe. If you use granulated sugar it will give you a grainy whipped cream. I tested the recipe using Swerve Confectioners for a sugar free whipped cream and it worked really well. So for those of you who are on a keto diet or need to be on sugar-free diet, you can have your whipped cream guilt free! For those of you who don’t know what Swerve is, it’s a sugar replacement that doesn’t raise insulin levels. Usually you would use the same amount as you use for regular sugar. And if you want it sweeter, you can always add more sugar to the mix, no matter if you are using regular sugar or Swerve.

Finally you have to decide on the flavoring. You can use any extract you want for this. I prefer the Clear Vanilla Extract to avoid getting the brown color on the whipped cream, but you can use your regular Vanilla if you prefer. You can also make it chocolatey by adding cocoa or melted chocolate. The sky is the limit with this recipe but the downside to it is that it needs to be kept in the fridge. So if you don’t like cold cake you will need to wait till my next tutorial so I can talk about other options for dairy free whipped cream substitutes.

But for now I think this is plenty of information for you guys. So click here for the full recipe and video tutorial on how to make Stabilized Whipped Cream.

Click here to go watch Tutorial and see full recipe.

I hope you guys enjoy the information. I know is a lot of it but is worth the knowledge.

Until next Blog, Ta ta!
Edna

 

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Celebration Cupcakes- Tutorial

Celebration Cupcake=4th of July

Presione aqui para Español

I did this cupcake for the 4th of July and decided to film it while I was working
on it, (click here to watch the video). I love the design on this cupcake. I know many people will say, “that’s too much work for a cupcake”. Yeah, it has some work, and it would be a lot of work if you want to do all your cupcakes with the same design. The beauty about making cupcakes is that you can make them all in different designs. By doing some simple ones, your most complicated ones will shine and make a statement.
Roses, stripes and Stars cupcake. 4th of July CelebrationHere is the cupcake! I used the Strip Cutter to makes the stripes. An easy way to make perfect stripes fast.

Strip Cutter #1 2

I love JEM Cutters. They have a series of cutters that can be place in  a foam they created so you can cut your pieces upside down. I love using the cutters this way because you can make sure that the cut is clean.

Here to the right is the cutter I used. You  can click on the photo for more info on that tool.

JEM Roller foam

To the left is the Roller Foam. As you can see it works with a lot of the delicate cutters from this company.  Click on the photo for more info. I added to the cupcake some stars.  As many of you might already know, I love plunger cutters. I move fast when I used them and that’s important when making cakes.Gold highlighter

 

I painted the stars using my favorite gold highlighter.I did a few months ago a video that teaches how to use the Gold highlighter. You can click here to check the tutorial.

Miniature gumpaste rose.

I took this photo while I was doing the roses. Miniature roses are fun to make. But it’s important to be able to move fast when doing them. You really don’t want to spend hours making a little tiny flower. I have 2 ways of doing these roses and in the video I just used no cutters. I will do and advanced tutorial on these flowers for those who want to learn to make them.

Celebration Cupcake Tutorial

Click on the photo to go see the tutorial.

I hope you enjoy the video!
Until next time, ta ta!
Edna 😉

Cake Fun Contest- Week 2

Week 1 was a success. Here are the winners chosen by you guys.

Alis Nonoleta Nuta was the winner for the beginners cake, and Beverly Call Brown was the winner for the more advanced cakes. These 2 cakes were part of our first weeks competition.

Alis Nonoleta Nuta

Alis Nonoleta Nuta

Beverly Call Brown

Beverly Call Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We now begin voting for the 2nd week of this contest. Scroll down to choose your favorite beginner and advanced cake. Leave a comment below with your favorites for each division.

Here are the names and the cakes chosen for Advanced cakes:

Christine Jelloian

Christine Jelloian

Leyla Sanabria-Perez

Leyla Sanabria-Perez

Michelle Head

Michelle Head

 

Here are the names and the cakes chosen for Beginners cakes:

Debbie Shaw

Debbie Shaw

Jessica M. Dorman‎

Jessica M. Dorman‎

Judy Stebbings

Judy Stebbings

Remember to choose one cake for the advanced level, and one for the beginners level. Post the names of your favorite cakes in the comments below. I will announce the winners next week.

In the meantime, don’t forget to post your cakes with the BEGINNERS or ADVANCELABELS on them so I can place your cake in the right division. Post them on the thread that is pinned at the top of my page by clicking here: Facebook Page Design Me a Cake.

Remember you can be a winner! The final prize will be a cake toy for each division from my web Store www.designmeacake.biz. Go check out all the goodies!!

I will ask of you guys to not spam the contest with fake votes or business promotions; this is a contest that is for fun. Remember to vote only once, and to list the names of each contestant for each division. Just have fun with it.

Remember, October 6th is the last date to submit your cakes for the final drawing. So if you didn’t win this week, keep posting your cakes with your title of beginners or advanced level. Good luck to everyone!

Until next time, Ta ta!
Edna 🙂

My Favorite Mixer for Cake Decorating

Image When I started making cakes years ago I always thought that for cake the most important things were piping bags and tips. I quickly found out that cake is much more than that. This is not an inexpensive hobby. You start with bags, tips, spatulas, turntables and pans, then you realize that this list is just the beginning. And it’s going to be really long. Now I need molds, veiners, gumpaste tools, special ingredients, special cutters and at the top of the list what most of us want is a great mixer. Yes, we all dream of the perfect mixer. That little handheld device you bought was great for small jobs but it just won’t do for long because we require power; to mix our buttercream, to make those cakes that require long periods of creaming the butter or making fondant and gumpaste. We put the mixer in a wishlist, we search for what we think would be the best and then we research about it; horse power, speeds, attachments and extras that we might get later. Then the question becomes: Do I want a tilt machine or the one that goes up and down? Usually we want bigger bowls so that kind of makes it even more complicated.

ImagePersonally I love the kitchen Aid mixer. If you’ve seen my videos you already know this. I love my tiny 4 quart Kitchen Aid. I found this machine on sale in Home Depot for $159.00, over 17 years ago and it still works like the first time I used it. Cake at the time was more of a hobby. I never thought when I started that cake was gonna become my life. So my little 4 quart cake mixer was perfect for my cakes and all the people that I made cakes for back then were enjoying the fruits of my new passion.

Today I can say that I still love my 4 quart machine. I did use the bigger mixer from kitchen Aid in the store I worked at but I didn’t like the one that goes up and down as much. I didn’t like the fact that the spatula doesn’t reach the bottom of the bowl when mixing and when you are mixing a few egg whites in a bowl, it becomes a bit annoying to have to lift the bowl to make sure it reaches down. Everybody has their own opinion and preferences. Some people love the tilting machine and others swear by the one that lifts up and down. I decided to stay with my smaller machine and bought a 5 quart glass bowl. Then, finally,  I was completely happy with my mixer.

Image

I loved the glass bowl because I could see the mix  and this worked great for my tutorials as well. The bowl has a lid and that is a plus in my book. But the downfall is that the bowl can get a bit heavy. Still, I love it enough to grow muscles, just so I can hold it. The tilt machines usually have less horsepower. So if you’re looking for lots of power, then you have no choice to go to the ones that go up and down. The commercial type mixers from Kitchen Aid are the type that lift. They have bowls from 6 quarts to the last one I saw that has 8 quarts. So for those of you who want bigger, they do have it and you can get extra bowls to fit your needs. They even sell lids for them and pouring shields. Of course all these extras require you to pay money for them. Like I said, this is not an inexpensive hobby. Image For those who don’t know much about the kitchen Aid, this machine comes with 3 mixing attachments. Image These attachments are the paddle, the whisk and the hook. The paddle gives the mix a folding effect. The whisk is used more to bring air into the mix. I use it mostly for egg whites. And then you have the hook. This one can be used for breads but we, the cake people, tend to use this attachment for making Fondant or MMF.  A few years ago they brought a new paddle with a rubber edge. They said that the paddle will reach the bottom and the sides of the bowl. I though that was great, so I went and got me one. Image This is the paddle that I thought was the answer to my laziness of not wanting to lift my mixer to scrape the sides of it. All of a sudden my mixer was making a mess. I couldn’t understand why. I was not doing anything different. One day I was working with  the mixer and I was using the rubber paddle.  I had to do something else. I have more than one bowl so I decided to grab my old paddle, be lazy and not wash the one with the rubber side. Suddenly, my machine was no longer making a mess. So  I decided to wash the other one and I noticed that the rubber does scrape the bowl, but that lack of space between bowl and paddle was the same reason the flour was flying everywhere. So, as far as it goes for me. I won’t use it again. I just don’t like the mess! As far as attachments, I love them. My favorite one is the pasta  roller. This I use to roll my gumpaste. Best attachment ever! Image I just saw the other day that they have something called a water jacket. I think that will be my next buy. Great for making icings that require to go from hot to cold while it’s mixing, like Suspiro, (almost the same as the 7 minute icing). Image I’m not getting paid by Kitchen Aid to talk about them, lol. But this is the mixer I love. So for those of you who want to get a new mixer I hope this helps. For those of you who would rather buy some other brand, just do your research and see the options the mixer has, the attachments and all the extras that might make your work in the kitchen a lot faster. Remember, the time you save by working faster is money you save. A good mixer is an investment. A good one should last for a long time. If  you want to check more about Kitchen Aid, you can visit their website at http://www.kitchenaid.com. This is it for now. Until my next blog. Ta Ta! Edna 😉